Cucumbers

The vine cucumber grows on a sturdy vine covered with large leaves. These plants grow rapidly and, with proper care, yield abundantly. Grape varieties grow best when forming trellis or fences. They are cleaner, often more productive, and easier to pick than those grown directly on the ground. Shrub cucumbers, on the other hand, are suitable for potted plants and small gardens. Perform continuous planting (every 2 weeks for additional crops). In already warm soil, cucumbers grow rapidly and ripen in about 6 weeks!  If you are interested in making pickles, we recommend fertile varieties specially bred for pickles, such as: B. The ancestral “Boston Pickles”. Get your crispy cucumbers ready within a few hours of harvesting!

How to grow cucumbers at home

About cucumbers

There are two types of cucumbers: vine cucumbers and shrub cucumbers. The vine cucumber grows on a sturdy vine covered with large leaves. These plants grow rapidly and, with proper care, yield abundantly. Grape varieties grow best when forming trellis or fences. They are cleaner, often more productive, and easier to pick than those grown directly on the ground. Shrub cucumbers, on the other hand, are suitable for potted plants and small gardens. Perform continuous planting (every 2 weeks for additional crops). In already warm soil, cucumbers grow rapidly and ripen in about 6 weeks!  If you are interested in making pickles, we recommend fertile varieties specially bred for pickles, such as B. The ancestral “Boston Pickles”. Prepare crispy cucumbers within a few hours after harvesting!

When to plant cucumbers?

Cucumbers should be sown or transplanted to the outdoor ground within two weeks of the last frost. Cucumbers are very susceptible to frost and cold. The soil must be at least 70 degrees Fahrenheit for germination. Do not plant outdoors too early! To get started early, sow cucumber seeds about three weeks before planting in the soil of your home. They like the bottom heat of about 21 ° C. If you don’t have a heating mat, lay the seeds flat in the refrigerator or in the water heater.

Selection and preparation of planting area choose a place full of sun. Cucumbers need warmth and lots of light.

Cucumber requires fertile soil. Mix compost and/or aged fertilizer to a depth of 5 cm before planting and place 6-20 cm in the soil. Make sure the soil is moist, well-drained, soaked, and uncompressed. The soil should be neutral or slightly acidic and the pH should be about 6.5-7.0. Improves clayey soil by adding organic matter. Add peat, compost, or rotten fertilizer to improve dense, heavy soil. (If you don’t know the type of soil, does a soil test. Check with your local collaborators.) Light and sandy soils are suitable for the northern gardens, as they warm up quickly in the spring.

Cucumber planting

Depending on the variety, continue to plant seeds 1 inch deep and approximately 2-3 feet apart. For vines that form on a trellis, plant the plants one foot apart. Cucumbers can also be planted on mounds (or “mounds”) 1-2 feet apart, with 2-3 seeds on each mound. When the plant reaches 4 inches in height, thin it into one plant per mound.

If you live in a cool climate, you can warm the ground by covering the mounds or rows with black plastic. After planting, mulch the area with straw, chopped leaves, or other organic mulch to keep pests away. Also, keep shrub species away from the ground to prevent disease. If you want to climb vines or don’t have enough space, we recommend Trellis. Trellis also protects the fruit from the damage caused by lying on moist ground. Find out how to make trellis and help grow vegetables. If there are pests, cover the freshly planted cucumber seeds with a net or berry basket. This prevents them from digging seeds.

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How to Grow cucumbers?

The most important need to care for cucumbers is water-consistent watering! You need at least an inch of water a week (or more if the temperature is very high). Stick your finger in the soil, pass the index finger joint and dry, then water. Uneven watering leads to bitter fruit. Water slowly early in the morning or afternoon to avoid the leaves and avoid promoting leaf diseases that can ruin the plant. If possible, water the cucumbers with a soaking hose or drip irrigation to keep the leaves dry.

Mulch maintains soil moisture. When seedlings appear, start watering frequently and increase to 1 gallon one week after fruit formation. When the seedlings reach 4 inches, thin the plants and keep them at least 1½ feet apart. If you take the organic matter into the soil before planting, all you may need to do is cover your plant with compost or well-rotten fertilizer. If necessary, use liquid fertilizer from the gardening store. When planting, apply directly to the soil around the plant every 1 to 3 weeks after flowering. Alternatively, granular fertilizer can be injected into the soil. Do not over-fertilize. Otherwise, the fruit will die. If space is tight or if you prefer vertical vines, install trellis early to prevent damage to seedlings and vines. Sprinkle sugar water on the vines to attract bees and plant more fruits.

How to grow cucumbers at home

Pests/diseases

Little or no fruit: If your cucumber plant is not bearing fruit, it is usually not a disease. Probably there is a pollination problem. The first flowers were all men. Both female and male flowers need to bloom at the same time. This cannot happen early in the life of the plant, so wait patiently. (A female flower is a flower that has a small cucumber-shaped swell at the base and bears fruit.) Fruit shortages can also be due to poor pollination by bees, especially rain and cold, or pesticides. For your safety, you can always perform hand-pollination. (Soak Qtip in male pollen and move it to the center of the female flower.) Remember that gynecological hybrids require pollen hybrids. Pumpkin insects can attack seedlings. Aphids are always a nuisance to any vegetable, but they are easy to manage. Powdery mildew can be a problem when the leaves get wet (groundwater). Apply disinfectants at the first sign of their presence. Cucumber beetles can attack vines and cause illness.

Recommended varieties

“Bar Press Bush Hybrid” is a popular bush cucumber. “Boston Pickles” are the most popular heirloom varieties specially bred for pickles. We also recommend the disease-resistant “Sassy” or “Calypso” for early harvesting. The long and thin “Parisian pickles” are perfect for making cucumbers and gherkins. Lemon cucumbers are small cucumbers that many people can trust.